1. Remembering July 1964

Fifty years ago, our country was in the throes of a great struggle for racial equality. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed by President Johnson on July 2, was a landmark piece of legislation that protected voting rights and outlawed discrimination and segregation on the grounds of race, color, religion, or national origin.

    Remembering July 1964

    Fifty years ago, our country was in the throes of a great struggle for racial equality. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed by President Johnson on July 2, was a landmark piece of legislation that protected voting rights and outlawed discrimination and segregation on the grounds of race, color, religion, or national origin.

  2. Remembering July 1964

Fifty years ago, our country was in the throes of a great struggle for racial equality. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed by President Johnson on July 2, was a landmark piece of legislation that protected voting rights and outlawed discrimination and segregation on the grounds of race, color, religion, or national origin.

    Remembering July 1964

    Fifty years ago, our country was in the throes of a great struggle for racial equality. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed by President Johnson on July 2, was a landmark piece of legislation that protected voting rights and outlawed discrimination and segregation on the grounds of race, color, religion, or national origin.

  3. The High Falls Center: A Year in Review

    The High Falls Center: A Year in Review

    About a year ago, in late July 2013, I learned that the Local History Division of the Rochester Public Library was going to assume operations for the High Falls Center at 74 Brown’s Race. Not only that, but I was being offered the opportunity to serve as the primary site manager for a museum and visitor’s center nestled in the heart of one of Rochester’s most historic districts. It was all very…

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  4. Pick Up the New Directory of Canal-Related Sites and Museums

    Pick Up the New Directory of Canal-Related Sites and Museums

    Free guide available at 45 attractions, including the Rochester Public Library, 115 South Ave., and the High Falls Center & Interpretive Museum, 74 Browns Race.

    There’s a lot to be said for online guides and apps, but sometimes it’s nice to have an old fashioned brochure in hand – or in your glove compartment, boat map case, or bike bag – to help you find your way to interesting places.

    The Erie…

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  5. More genealogy news! New York prison records available online at Ancestry

    More genealogy news! New York prison records available online at Ancestry

    New York residents can access now access select state prison records for free from anywhere at Ancestry.com. But remember that Ancestry is always free in the Local History & Genealogy Division. For more information on the newly available prison records, read this New York Times article:
    Archives From Prisons in New York Are Digitized.

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  6. New England Naturalizations Records, 1791-1906, Released on Findmypast

    New England Naturalizations Records, 1791-1906, Released on Findmypast

    FindMyPast has just released naturalization records from six New England states. If these might be of use to you in your hunt for your ancestors, be sure to visit the Local History & Genealogy Division to use FindMyPast for free! Here is more information on the newly available records:

    New England Naturalizations records 1791-1906 released on Findmypast.

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  7. A Kinder, Gentler Fourth

    A Kinder, Gentler Fourth

    1918 Fourth of July

    The 1918 Fourth of July celebration in Rochester. Mayor Hiram Edgerton is on a platform with Gov. Charles S. Whitman. From the collection of the Rochester Public Library Local History Division.

    It’s that time of year when, to quote The Simpsons, we “celebrate the independence of [our] nation by blowing up a small part of it.”

    All joking aside though, fireworks and their discharge could be a…

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  8. John Nyerges

  9. Gabe Condon